C Diff Bacteria Infection: Prevention, Treatment of C Diff Infection

C. diff bacterial infection happens when there is an imbalance of bacteria in the colon. Normally, the large intestines are inhabited by a balance of good and bad bacteria known as clostridium difficile. This balance of bacteria largely contributes to the normal defecation process and digestion. When this balance is disrupted, the number of bad bacteria increases paving the way to c. diff bacterial infection.

There are two types of c. diff bacterium: an active and infectious form yet cannot survive in an open environment for a prolonged period and another is the nonactive and noninfectious form called spores that can survive in an open environment for long period of time.

C. Diff Bacterial Infection Prevention

C. diff bacterial infection happens when spores are ingested and transformed into active and infectious form. To avoid getting infected with these harmful bacteria, you should avoid areas where there is a high propensity of bacterial presence. These areas include:

  • Hospitals and nursing homes including the bedpans, stethoscope and toilet seats
  • Extended care facilities
  • Newborn infant nurseries and diaper pails
  • Household furniture
  • Telephone
  • Floors
  • Pet cage and pets themselves
  • Linens
  • Jewelries
  • Fingernails

C. Diff Bacterial Infection Treatment

Aside from proper medication, c.

diff bacterial infection can be further prevented by taking these following tips:

  • Keep your environment as clean and sterile as possible especially in hospital and nursery settings.
  • Keep your immune system up by eating right and well-balanced food. Include plenty of fresh fruits and vegetables in your every meal.
  • Frequently wash your hands with antibacterial soap especially before and after tending infants and while in hospitals. You can also wash your hands with disinfectants while in the area.
  • Keep your toilet clean and sterile as possible.
  • Remove jewelries such as rings and bracelets when cooking or preparing food.
  • Maintain a good personal hygiene.

One Comment

  1. robert bennett said:

    My wife has been diagnosed with c-diff. It has caused her to not absorb her protein and now she has edema all up her legs and abdomen, she had a gastric bypass in 2003 and already suffers from severe protein calorie mal-absorbtion. What do we do?

    May 16, 2010
    Reply

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